Rules of investing

The Rules of
Investing

Investment Rules Protect You
From Investment Mistakes

By following a few core investment principles, you’re ensuring that you stay on track when times are tough and that you don’t get off track by the noise of Wall Street or other “financial experts.” You must follow the rules we’ve outlined in our course if you want to be a successful investor.

These 5 Core Rules Of Investing Protect Your Long-Term Potential

You don’t have to invest without guidelines, and we’ve defined 5 guidelines (we call them rules) to help you invest safely. Outlined further in our course, these rules will give you the confidence to invest and the comfort of knowing you’re doing so correctly and with a sound investment strategy.

RULE NO. 1

Hold Each Investment For At Least 10 Years

All investments take time to mature, grow, and compound. Because of this, you must invest with the long term in mind. Remember, the more trades you make, the more fees you pay, and the more opportunity cost you may lose. Successful investing is like planting a tree, watering it, and watching it grow. It’s a long game.

RULE NO. 2

Establish A Target Asset Mix

Your overall investment goals, the timeframe in which you need the cash, and the risk tolerance you have should determine the target asset mix and account you invest in. By choosing the right asset mix for you, you get to decide your comfort with the annual volatility of the stock market.

Our recommendation is to invest in a 65/35 asset mix of stocks and bonds (two-thirds stocks and one-third bonds). This provides you with both a growth option and a savings option in the same portfolio.

RULE NO. 3

Don’t Invest In Anything You Don’t Understand

Knowledge is simply an understanding of what you need to know and what you need to ignore. When making any type of investment, be sure you understand what you’re investing in, how profitable it should/will be, and how it aligns with your investment criteria.

Remember, assets you don’t own can’t hurt you, and you don’t have to be in a rush to lose money. Instead, make sure you thoroughly understand the investments you’re investing in.

RULE NO. 4

Evaluate Your Investment Expenses Annually

While investing should be a long-term commitment, it should be checked and assessed annually. We call that assessment an Annual Investment Physical. This focuses on your investment fees, the performance of the account, and how all of that aligns with your current lifestyle and needs.

By performing an annual physical with your investments you’ll be creating quality habits around assessing the quality of where your money is going, and how it’s performing (not just responding emotionally when markets are up or down).

RULE NO. 5

Make Only Modest Changes Throughout The Year

This might be one of the most important rules. Remember, investing is not an emotional process, it’s a habitual one. Making too many changes can interrupt what could be an exciting investment that just needs a little time to perform. Also, by exercising restraint you’ll be creating a sense of comfort and control over your investments and protecting yourself from yourself.

Ready To Confidently Engage With Your
Financial Investments?

If you’re ready to change your relationship with money and better
understand the practical tools of investing, sign up to take the course today.

Why Beginning Investors Are
Believers In Objective Measure

Experience

With nearly 50 years of financial experience, the Objective Measure team brings access to knowledge that others pay big dollars for.

Non-Profit Status

Investing is not meant to make you rich, but a purposeful activity meant to enrich your life. When was the last time you asked yourself, how might I enrich my life if I learned to invest confidently?

Roadmap

When you’re a part of the Objective Measure ecosystem, you get access to your financial success roadmap. This means you step through education & training to improve your thinking. From improved thinking to empowerment. From empowerment to changed behavior. And from changed behavior to different results.

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